Mulligan's Shanty

William Thomas Goodge 1862 – 1909

Things is just the same as ever
  On the outer Never-Never,
And you look to find the stock of liquor scanty,
  But we found things worse than ordin'ry,
  And in fact a bit extraordin'ry
When myself and Bill the Pinker struck the shanty.
  'Shanty,' says you. 'What shanty?'
  Why, Mulligan's shanty.

  I says 'Whisky'; Bill says 'Brandy';
  But there wasn't either handy,
For the boss was out of liquor in that line.
  'Well, I'll try a rum,' says Billy.
  'Got no rum,' he answers, chilly,
'But I'll recommend a decent drop o' tine.'
  'Tine?' says Bill; 'what tine?'
  'Why, turpentine!'

  'Blow me blue!' says Bill the Pinker,
  'Can't yer give us a deep-sinker?
Ain't you got a cask o' beer behind the screen?'
  Bill was getting pretty cranky,
  But there wasn't any swanky.
Says the landlord, 'Why not have a drop o' sene?'
  'Sene?' says Bill; 'what sene?'
  'Why, kerosene!'

  Well, we wouldn't spend a tanner,
  But the boss's pleasant manner
All our cursing couldn't easily demolish.
  Says he, 'Strike me perpendic'lar
  But you beggars are partic'lar,
Why, the squatter in the parlor's drinking polish!'
  'Polish?' says Bill, 'what polish?'
  'Why, furniture-polish!'

Rate this poem:(0.00 / 0 votes)
Collection  Edit     
 

Submitted on May 13, 2011

44 Views

William Thomas Goodge

William Thomas Goodge (28 September 1862 – 28 November 1909) was an English writer and journalist, who arrived in Australia in 1882, after jumping ship in Sydney. He worked in various jobs in New South Wales, including as a coal-miner, until he was engaged to write for "The Tribune" in North Sydney, a small weekly associated with the "Daily Telegraph". From there he was chosen by Harry Newman (Member of Parliament and newspaper proprietor) to edit "The Leader" newspaper in Orange, NSW. Goodge remained in Orange, becoming part-owner of "The Leader" at some point, until in the early 1900s he returned to Sydney and began writing for that city's newspapers, especially "The Sunday Times". Goodge was first married on 21 January 1892. His wife died 3 January 1895 of typhoid, leaving behind two children. Sometime later he remarried and had another child. Goodge died on 28 November 1909 in North Sydney. During his writing career, Goodge wrote mainly light-verse poems and short stories. Although he did have one novel, The Fortunes of Fenchurch, serialised in the pages of The Sunday Times, the book was never published separately. His best known works were "The Great Australian Adjective", and "The Oozlum Bird". Norman Lindsay, who illustrated the reprint volume of Goodge's only poetry collection, considered the poet better than C. J. Dennis. "Goodge, with his Hits! Skits! and Jingles!, is a much better light-verse writer than Dennis, and his book should be reprinted."  more…

All William Thomas Goodge poems | William Thomas Goodge Books

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Discuss this William Thomas Goodge poem with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Find a translation for this poem in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this poem to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Mulligan's Shanty" Poetry.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 26 Sep. 2020. <https://www.poetry.net/poem/41748/mulligan's-shanty>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest poetry community and poems collection on the web!

    Our favorite collection of

    Famous Poets

    »

    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.