Love is Enough: Songs I-IX

I1.
  Love is enough: though the World be a-waning
.
  And the woods have no voice but the voice of complaining,
.
  Though the sky be too dark for dim eyes to discover
.
  The gold-cups and daisies fair blooming thereunder,
.
  Though the hills be held shadows, and the sea a dark wonder,
.
  And this day draw a veil over all deeds passed over,
.
  Yet their hands shall not tremble, their feet shall not falter;
.
  The void shall not weary, the fear shall not alter
.
  These lips and these eyes of the loved and the lover.II2.
  Love is enough: have no thought for to-morrow
.
  If ye lie down this even in rest from your pain,
.
  Ye who have paid for your bliss with great sorrow:
.
  For as it was once so it shall be again.
.
  Ye shall cry out for death as ye stretch forth in vain2.
  Feeble hands to the hands that would help but they may not,
.
  Cry out to deaf ears that would hear if they could;
.
  Till again shall the change come, and words your lips say not
.
  Your hearts make all plain in the best wise they would
.

  And the world ye thought waning is glorious and good:2.

  And no morning now mocks you and no nightfall is weary,
.

  The plains are not empty of song and of deed:
.

  The sea strayeth not, nor the mountains are dreary;
.

  The wind is not helpless for any man's need,
.

  Nor falleth the rain but for thistle and weed.2.

  O surely this morning all sorrow is hidden,
.

  All battle is hushed for this even at least;
.

  And no one this noontide may hunger, unbidden
.

  To the flowers and the singing and the joy of your feast
.

  Where silent ye sit midst the world's tale increased.2.

  Lo, the lovers unloved that draw nigh for your blessing!
.

  For your tale makes the dreaming whereby yet they live
.

  The dreams of the day with their hopes of redressing,
.

  The dreams of the night with the kisses they give,
.

  The dreams of the dawn wherein death and hope strive.2.

  Ah, what shall we say then, but that earth threatened often
.

  Shall live on for ever that such things may be,
.

  That the dry seed shall quicken, the hard earth shall soften,
.

  And the spring-bearing birds flutter north o'er the sea,
.

  That earth's garden may bloom round my love's feet and me?III3.
  Love is enough: it grew up without heeding
.
  In the days when ye knew not its name nor its measure,
.
  And its leaflets untrodden by the light feet of pleasure
.
  Had no boast of the blossom, no sign of the seeding,
.
  As the morning and evening passed over its treasure.3.
  And what do ye say then?--That Spring long departed
.
  Has brought forth no child to the softness and showers;
.
  --That we slept and we dreamed through the Summer of flowers;
.
  We dreamed of the Winter, and waking dead-hearted
.

  Found Winter upon us and waste of dull hours.3.

  Nay, Spring was o'er-happy and knew not the reason,
.

  And Summer dreamed sadly, for she thought all was ended
.

  In her fulness of wealth that might not be amended;
.

  But this is the harvest and the garnering season,
.

  And the leaf and the blossom in the ripe fruit are blended.3.

  It sprang without sowing, it grew without heeding,
.

  Ye knew not its name and ye knew not its measure,
.

  Ye noted it not mid your hope and your pleasure;
.

  There was pain in its blossom, despair in its seeding,
.

  But daylong your bosom now nurseth its treasure.IV4.
  Love is enough: draw near and behold me
.
  Ye who pass by the way to your rest and your laughter,
.
  And are full of the hope of the dawn coming after;
.
  For the strong of the world have bought me and sold me
.
  And my house is all wasted from threshold to rafter.
.
  --Pass by me, and hearken, and think of me not!4.
  Cry out and come near; for my ears may not hearken,
.
  And my eyes are grown dim as the eyes of the dying.
.
  Is this the grey rack o'er the sun's face a-flying?
.

  Or is it your faces his brightness that darken?
.

  Comes a
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William Morris

William Morris, Mayor of Galway, 1527-28. more…

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"Love is Enough: Songs I-IX" Poetry.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 25 May 2020. <https://www.poetry.net/poem/41112/love-is-enough:-songs-i-ix>.

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