Introductory 04

Again, the bride of imagination can for want of beauty not lift up her head nor raise her eyes from the feet of bashfulness to appear in the assembly of persons endowed with pulchritude, unless adorned with the ornaments of approbation from the great Amir, who is learned, just, aided by heaven, victorious, supporter of the throne of the Sultanate and councillor in deliberations of the realm, refuge of the poor, asylum of strangers, patron of learned men, lover of the pious, glory of the dynasty of Pares, right hand of the kingdom, chief of the nobles, boast of the monarchy and of the religion, succour of Islam and of the Musalmans, buttress of kings and sultans, Abu Bekr, son of Abu Nassar, may Allah prolong his life, augment his dignity, enlighten his breast and increase his reward twofold, because he enjoys the praise of all great men and is the embodiment of every laudable quality.

  Whoever reposes in the shadow of his favour,
  His sin is transmuted to obedience and his foe into a friend.

Every attendant and follower has an appointed duty and if, in the performance thereof, he gives way to remissness and indolence, he is certainly called to account and becomes subject to reproaches, except the tribe of dervishes, from whom thanks are due for the benefits they receive from great men as well as praises and prayers, all of which duties are more suitably performed in their absence than in their presence, because in the latter they look like ostentation and in the former they are free from ceremony.

  The back of the bent sky became flat with joy,
  When dame nature brought forth a child like thee.
  It is an instance of wisdom if the Creator
  Causes a servant to make the general welfare his special duty.
  He has found eternal happiness who lived a good life,
  Because, after his end, good repute will keep his name alive.
  No matter whether virtuous men praise you or not
  A lovely maid stands in no need of a tire woman.

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"Introductory 04" Poetry.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 18 Sep. 2019. <https://www.poetry.net/poem/34057/introductory-04>.

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